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Trump’s tax cuts likely to have limited impact on growth

May 14, 2017 Leave a comment

Donald Trump has indicated that the US economy needs a big tax cut to stimulate some growth and aggregate demand –  C+I+G+(X-M). His rationale is that with consumers having greater income they will spend consume more (C) and businesses keeping more of their profits will invest more (I). He is even so confident that the tax cuts won’t put a dent in the overall tax revenue of the government. However economists are suggesting that the US economy is already growing as fast as it can and in order to improve its growth rate it needs to investment in productivity.

D Pull Inflation.jpegNevertheless, US tax cuts in the 1980’s under Ronald Reagan proved to be very effective in stimulating aggregate demand but the economic environment then was different to that of today. The 1980’s was an era of stagflation with the US experiencing 10% unemployment and inflation reaching 15%. Since the GFC in 2007 growth has been positive and unlike the 1980’s unemployment has been falling  – from 10% in Oct 2009 to 4.4% in April 20178. Tax cuts are all very well when you have high unemployment but with the rate falling to under 5% companies may find it difficult to respond to the greater demand for goods and services by taking on workers to increase supply. Tax cuts would then lead to an increase in inflationary pressure (see graph) which is turn would prompt the US Fed to increase interest rates.

ProductivityTrump’s plan would also increase the Federal deficit and borrowing from the government. This would put upward pressure on interest rates for the private sector which reduces the potential for further growth. As noted earlier the area that needs to be addressed is productivity, with a shift of the LRAS curve to the right – see graph.

Categories: Growth, Inflation, Interest Rates Tags: ,

The Doughnut Model of Economics

May 8, 2017 Leave a comment

A recent book entitled “Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist” by Kate Raworth of Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute, offers an alternative to the all too familiar policy of economic growth to solve the issues of poverty, inequality, unemployment in the global economy. Simon Kuznets, who normalised the measurement of economic growth, stated that national income cannot be a accurate measure of total welfare in an economy as it only measures annual flows of money and not stocks of wealth and their distribution. Raworth states that the current model of endless economic growth using up the finite resources of the planet is not the way forward. Most textbooks refer to the circular flow as the model of the economic system – households, firms, banks, overseas markets and the government which bears little relationship to reality today. Instead Raworth goes beyond this simple circular flow model and includes social and environmental issues – energy, the environment, raw materials, water pollution etc.

The Doughnut
Raworth’s circular flow consists of two rings – see graphic below.

Doughnut Economics.jpeg

Inner Ring – this consists of the social foundation and those things we need for a good life – food, water, health, education, peace and justice etc. People living within this ring in the hole in the middle are in a state of deprivation.

Outer Ring – this consists of the earth environmental limits – climate change, ozone depletion, water pollution, loss of species etc.

The area between the two rings is the “ecologically safe and socially just space” in which humanity should strive to live. As stated in The Guardian review, the purpose of economics should be to help us enter that space and stay there. As the graphic shows we breach both rings as billions of people live below the poverty line and climate conditions, biodiversity loss, land conversion etc are at concerning levels. The video below is a useful explanation.

Will there be a recovery in global dairy prices?

April 9, 2017 Leave a comment

Dairy prices fell dramatically in 2014 and 2015, prompting the RBNZ to reverse 2014 OCR increases in 2015. Average prices on the GlobalDairyTrade auction fell by 38% in 2014/2015 and 20% in the 2015/2016 to mid-March.

Inconsistent Chinese demand and increased European/US dairy supply causing the perfect storm of plummeting whole milk powder prices. Thankfully, for dairy farmers and the NZ economy dairy prices recovered in late 2016 but can it be maintained into 2017? Here are some reasons why prices may recover:

  1. EU production is slowing down
  2. New Zealand production is also likely to fall
  3. Demand from China is likely to increase
  4. ASB rural economist Nathan Penny noted three things that would impact the price of milk. One as the fact that milk production was held back before the removal of annual quotas at the end of March 2015 as countries avoided paying penalties associated with producing above quota. Two, after the April removal of quotas, production surged in the EU with April production rising over 3% on a month-by-month basis. Three that post-quota surge has now passed, with production growth slowing, particularly since July, as farmers have struggled with low milk prices.

Once supply is more aligned to demand, global prices are expected to rise again. Europe collectively is the world’s largest dairy exporter, accounting for nearly a third of global export sales. EU exports increased by 6% in milk equivalent last year.

GDT 2012-26.png

 Sources: National Business Review and PWC

Categories: Growth, Trade Tags:

A2 Economics – Keynesians vs Monetarists

March 29, 2017 Leave a comment

Just been going through this part of the course with my A2 class and came across a table from some old A Level notes produced by Russell Tillson (ex Epsom College Economics and Politics Department) to help them understand the principal differences.

Options for taking on Trump – the Japanese Model.

February 7, 2017 Leave a comment

trump-abeA colleague alerted me to a Terrie Lloyd a New Zealand businessman in Japan who writes a weekly newsletter. With the election of Donald Trump his recent writing looked at bullies and ways in which you deal with them. Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, has been proactive in getting to know Trump and his team and how the two countries can work together.

Research on bullies

Lloyd suggests that there are generally three ways to deal with a bully.

Run – UK seem to be taking this option
Fight – Chinese will do this
Suffer and appease – Japan, having a bullying culture already, will go for appeasement

Abe will be meeting with Trump on 10th February for a second time in as many months and will want to convince him that Japan is one of the good guys and if he has to pick on someone in the area he should pick on China. For this to work Abe also needs to feed Trump’s ego publicly

Lloyd looks at the work of Dacher Keltner who has written about appeasement and related
human emotion and social practice. He looks at two general classes of appeasement.

1) reactive – the person provides appropriate responses after incidents and these responses are usually public displays of embarrassment and shame.
2) anticipatory appeasement where a person is proactive and engages in certain strategies to avoid conflict. Polite modesty and shyness are also considered anticipatory appeasement.

Japanese Model for dealing with bullies

With Japan taking the latter option, Keltner is suggesting that Abe must appease Trump with gifts of value and that they are seen publicly to assist Trumps power and reputation. Last month the Japanese gave access to US car manufacturers but will that be enough to keep Trump happy? At the meeting on 10th February Abe will propose a package that could generate 700,000 U.S. jobs and help create a $450-billion market. It includes the building of infrastructure projects such as high-speed trains in the northeastern United States, and the states of Texas and California, and renovating subway and train cars. It also includes cooperation in global infrastructure investment, joint development of robots and artificial intelligence, and cooperation in cybersecurity and space exploration, among others.

Toyota the car manufacturer has also been taking the appeasement option after the Trump administration criticised their building of a second car assembly plant in Mexico and also threatened to impose a 20% tariff on Japanese automobile and auto parts makers with plants in Mexico. Toyota quickly announced it would invest $10 billion in its U.S. operations over the next five years.

Abe has definitely been massaging the ego of Trump not only being the first international leader to visit Washington after his election but also telling Trump that he “hopes the United States will become a greater country through (your) leadership,” adding Japan wants to “fulfill our role as your ally.” It will be interesting to see what happens after their meeting on Friday 10th February.

Sources: Terrie Lloyd,  The Japan Times

Do we need another measure of economic prosperity?

February 2, 2017 Leave a comment

I have written on this blog about the limitations of GDP as a measure of the standard of living in a country and would recommend reading Diane Coyle’s book ‘GDP: A Brief but Affectionate History’. Edoardo Campanella wrote a piece for Project Syndicate about abandoning GDP and how people have concerns with the pace of growth and how it is defined. He mentions two specific reasons for this:

1. Growth in the developed world has brought little benefit to the vast majority of citizens – the recovery in 2010 say the top 1% earn 93% of income growth.
2. Growth doesn’t actually take into consideration a lot of those things that contribute to human wellbeing. There is nothing about environmental conditions, the benefits of communities, the stability of individual and group identities etc

However today GDP determines a country’s status and access to clubs such as the OECD, G8, G20 thereby affecting the balance of global power.

Limits of GDP

GDP is a measure of the market value of all final goods and services produced in a year however it leaves out things that make us richer as people. For instance:

GDP declines if energy-efficient products reduce electricity consumption but rises with polluting activities that deplete the stock of natural resources. Also if we invest in anti-smoking campaigns or fight global terrorism, GDP will increase, without creating any wealth.

GDP is fixated on more not better – a car with air conditioning and a state of the art stereo system and GPS may be the same as one with no gadgets, regardless of differences in users’ experience. How do we measure the success of medical advancements especially in heart surgery that lead to greater life expectancy and a much better quality of life. One of the aspects that GDP misses are those things that are free in society, most notably the services provided on the Internet whether it be Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter etc. But some have argued that innovation actually reduces GDP even though it may increase the welfare of individuals. Today you can book accommodation, flights, buy products etc online and at a cheaper price than before as the middle person is now excluded from the process. Another example is the price of a smartphone is lower than the prices of its components that used to be sold separately.

Adjusting the numbers

In an effort to update their methodologies, countries add new activities to its calculations. Most recently drugs, prostitution, and other undercover activities have been included in the calculation. However as Edoardo Campanella points out these changes can distort the value of GDP across time. In 2010 Ghana announced a 60% increase in GDP after updating its data-reporting methodology but the the standard of living for Ghanaians hadn’t changed. Likewise the changes in the tax domicile of some multinationals in Ireland resulted in an increase in GDP by 16% but no one felt any richer.

Cross Country Comparisons using GDP – China v USA

There are problems in the cross-country GDP comparisons. 2014 saw the overall GDP of China surpass that of the USA. But a more accurate indicator would be GDP per person and China’s per person income amounts to only 27% of the USA. See figures below:

gdp-china-v-usa
Source: IMF

Are we any happier with more growth?

Countries maximize their output through technology, free trade (with comparative advantage) with the belief that greater GDP improves the well-bing of its population. Herek Bok of Harvard observed that “people are essentially n happier today than they were 50 years ago, despite a doubling or quadrupling of average per capita income”.

Another area that GDP does not consider is the distribution of income – two countries may be equal in overall GDP figures but differ greatly when you consider individual welfare. The elite have been rewarded disproportionately while many have been made worse off – the income of the top 1% has doubled since the late 1970’s at approximately 22% of GDP.

The way forward

As Edoardo Campanella suggests, rather than getting rid of GDP it should be refined and include socioeconomic indicators including GNH*. GDP cannot measure much of what people would consider crucial for a ‘good’ life – community, relationships, security etc.

*GNH – Bhutan is famous for its Gross National Happiness indicator which revolves around four pillars:
1. Sustainable Development
2. Preservation and promotion of cultural values
3. Conservation of the natural environment
4. Good governance

Categories: Growth Tags:

Contributions to world GDP 2013-16

January 30, 2017 Leave a comment

The Economist produced a graph showing world GDP data and made the following points:

  • India and China account for 65% of world growth
  • Emerging markets contributions in 2016 were down to its lowest figure since 2008 – falling commodity prices would have been a factor
  • Norway contributed less to global GDP with lower oil prices being prevalent.
  • USA with increased government spending and greater export volumes improved its position
  • Brazil has been in negative territory since mid 2014 – interesting point with significant government spending on hosting the Football World Cup and the Olympics.

Maybe a good starter for your classes asking the question who contributes most to world GDP?

World GDP 2013-16.png

 

Categories: Growth Tags: , , , , ,
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