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What is the Trade Weighted Index?

July 20, 2017 Leave a comment

Trade Weighted Index (T.W.I)

  • An index that measures the value of $NZ in relationship to a group (or “basket”) of other currencies. The currencies included are from NZ’s major export markets i.e. Australia, USA, Japan, Euro area, UK and China. – $A, $US, ¥, €, £ RMB
  • Each of the currencies included in the TWI is “weighted” according to how important exports to that country are ( = % of total exports)
  • From the TWI we can see if the $NZ has appreciated or depreciated against our major trading partners currencies overall.

TWI - NZ 17.png

The interpretation of the effective exchange rate is that if the index rises, other things being equal, the purchasing power of that currency also rises (the currency strengthened against those of the country’s or area’s trading partners). That will reduce the cost of imports but will undermine the competitiveness of exports.

TWI NZ

Internationally, global growth is continuing to improve, suggesting that excess global supply is easing. However, offshore political uncertainty has grown and continues to cast a shadow on NZ’s inflation outlook. Further, the NZ Trade Weighted Index (TWI) is hovering around 78 again, in part due to NZ economic fundamentals but also in part due to the above offshore political events.

Source: ASB Bank

 

 

Africa’s Resource Curse

July 1, 2017 Leave a comment

Below is a link to an excellent podcast from the BBC World Service. I have blogged on the resource curse before and the falls in commodity prices – oil and mining – over the last year have affected the sub-Saharan African countries that are dependent on their primary industries. There is also mention of GDP being a stupid model. Worth a listen – click on link below.

Africa: The Commodity Curse Returns

In the balance - Resource Curse

For most economies that have natural endowments like oil (Nigeria) or minerals, there is the risk of the economy experiencing the ‘resource curse’. This is when a natural resource begins to run out, or if there is a downturn in price, manufacturing industries that used to be competitive find it extremely difficult to return to an environment of profitability. According to Paul Collier, Nigeria has a resource curse of its own, the civil war trap in which 73% of the low income population have been affected by it, as well as a natural resource trap- where the so-called advantages of a commodity in monetary value did not eventuate – on average affecting only 30% of the low income population. It seems that in Nigeria there is a strong relationship between resource wealth and poor economic performance, poor governance and the prospect of civil conflicts. The comparative advantage of oil wealth in fact turns out to be a curse. governments and insurgent groups that determines the risk of conflict, not the ethnic or religious diversity. Others see oil as a “resource curse” due to the fact that it reduces the desire for democracy.

Click here for more on the Resource Curse from this blog

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Teaching why the Balance of Payments equals zero.

June 7, 2017 Leave a comment

A HT to colleague Nick Lloyd for this great explanation of the relationship between the current account and the capital and financial accounts. In theory the balance of payments should equal zero and this is one area that students find hard to comprehend. Hope you find it as useful as I did.

The Relationship between the Current Account and the Capital and Financial Account

A few starting points:

  1. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) = C + I + G + (X – M)
  2. Gross National Product (GNP) = GDP plus Net Income (Income Credits (Yc) – Income Debits (Yd))
  3. Saving/Investment Gap (S – I) = Balance on Capital and Financial Account (Capital Outflows (Ko) – Capital Inflows (Ki))
  4. Current Account Balance = Trade Balance (X – M) + Net Income (Yc – Yd)
  5. National Savings = GNP – (Private Spending (C) + Government Spending (G))

Now:

GNP                                      =               GDP + (Yc – Yd) =  C + I + G + (X – M) + (Yc – Yd)

GNP – (C + I + G)                 =               (X – M) + (Yc – Yd)

GNP – (C + G) – I                 =               (X – M) + (Yc – Yd)

S – I                                    =               (X – M) + (Yc – Yd)

Balance on Capital & Financial Account               =               Balance on Current Account

 

Another way to arrive at the same conclusion:

Assuming freely floating exchange rate is in equilibrium:

Demand for Currency = Supply of Currency

Demand comes from:     X + Yc + Ki

Supply comes from:        M + Yd + Ko

Thus when the forex market is in equilibrium:

Demand                         =               Supply

X + Yc + Ki                    =               M + Yd + Ko

(Ki – Ko)                        =               (M – X) + (Yd – Yc)

Balance on CFA               =               Balance on Current Account

 

So, if as a nation you earn more than you spend (current account surplus), you are in effect lending to the rest of the world (exporting savings) by accepting IOUs in the form of your increased holdings of foreign assets (shares, land, government bonds, etc.)

If as a nation you spend more than you earn (current account deficit), you must borrow from the rest of the world (import savings) in the form of increased foreign holdings of your domestic assets (shares, land, government bonds, etc.)

 

 

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Tourism booming in New Zealand and Lions tour still to come.

April 30, 2017 Leave a comment

Recent figures show that the tourism industry is now a bigger export earner that the traditional dairy industry. For the year ending December 2016, total exports of dairy and related products were $12.05bn, accounting for 17.2% of all exports. Over the same period, tourism (including air travel) was worth $12.17bn, or 17.4% of exports. These compare to 18.2% and 16.9% (respectively) for 2015, showing the increasing importance of tourism to the NZ economy. After these two industries, the next largest export is meat, all the way back on 8.4% of total exports, leaving tourism and dairy well out in front. If you look at GDP figures – Tourism accounts for 5.6% whilst Dairy is 5% of GDP.

NZ Goods and Services Exports (Values $m)

Exports - Dairy and Tourism

NZ Visitor arrivals.pngWhat are the drivers behind the tourism numbers?
1. The growth of the Chinese middle class who can now afford to travel overseas and additional carriers operating out of China into New Zealand
2. The impact of The Lord of the Rings and Hobbit films
3. The 2011 Rugby World Cup and 2015 Cricket World Cup boosted arrivals significantly.

Also there are two further events which are bound the increase tourist numbers – The World Masters Games that finished today and the British Lions Tour in June/July. The Lions Tour is bound to have a significant impact on the economy especially with the hype that is currently building which largely comes about as the tour only occurs every 12 years.

British Lions Tour 2005 and its impact on NZ Economy

Contribution to New Zealand’s GDP – 16,000 supporters at approximately $10,000 per trip equates to NZ$160 million or 0.1 per cent of GDP. But spending doesn’t equate to value added. Value added is broadly a third of the initial spend therefore this leaves a direct macro impact on value added of $53 million. Second round multiplier effects increase the impact to NZ$132.5 million or broadly 0.1% of GDP.

Retail sales figures for June 2005 were up 1.2%. Accommodation providers, for example, experienced a 5.1% increase in turnover during June. And spending in bars increased by 3.9% in June from May and spending a café and restaurants increased by 1.3% while liquor sales surged 3.7%.

Some economic pricing invariably led to higher prices in some markets. A terrace ticket cost NZ$100 for the Lions vs All Blacks game at Eden Park but excess demand on the black market did mean that some tickets were double the face value. Also prices in bars and cafés increased significantly in the main centres.

Spending Spree
Sales figures for June and July 2005 released by credit card operator Visa International show visiting Lions fans pumped millions of dollars into the New Zealand economy.
UK and Irish-based Visa card holders spent $42.2 million during the two-month period, more than double the amount spent by cardholders during the same period last year. Below is some of the breakdown:

Hotels, motels, resorts: $5,967,931
Travel agencies: $4,927,429
Vehicle rental: $2,574,812
Restaurants: $2,245,621
Tourist attractions: $1,588,492
Air New Zealand: $1,446,342

Although results didn’t go their way, the Lions supporters certainly had a good time. The impact is bound to be significantly greater this year with numbers of supporters up to around 20,000. However as with the 2005 tour there will significant infrastructure problems in meeting this demand.

After the win in Australia four years ago maybe the Lions could pull off a series win – the last time was 1971.

Categories: Sport, Trade Tags: , ,

Will there be a recovery in global dairy prices?

April 9, 2017 Leave a comment

Dairy prices fell dramatically in 2014 and 2015, prompting the RBNZ to reverse 2014 OCR increases in 2015. Average prices on the GlobalDairyTrade auction fell by 38% in 2014/2015 and 20% in the 2015/2016 to mid-March.

Inconsistent Chinese demand and increased European/US dairy supply causing the perfect storm of plummeting whole milk powder prices. Thankfully, for dairy farmers and the NZ economy dairy prices recovered in late 2016 but can it be maintained into 2017? Here are some reasons why prices may recover:

  1. EU production is slowing down
  2. New Zealand production is also likely to fall
  3. Demand from China is likely to increase
  4. ASB rural economist Nathan Penny noted three things that would impact the price of milk. One as the fact that milk production was held back before the removal of annual quotas at the end of March 2015 as countries avoided paying penalties associated with producing above quota. Two, after the April removal of quotas, production surged in the EU with April production rising over 3% on a month-by-month basis. Three that post-quota surge has now passed, with production growth slowing, particularly since July, as farmers have struggled with low milk prices.

Once supply is more aligned to demand, global prices are expected to rise again. Europe collectively is the world’s largest dairy exporter, accounting for nearly a third of global export sales. EU exports increased by 6% in milk equivalent last year.

GDT 2012-26.png

 Sources: National Business Review and PWC

Categories: Growth, Trade Tags:
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