Inflation on the way up

February 16, 2017 Leave a comment

Inflation is predicted to increase in the global economy in 2017 which is a welcoming thought when you consider the threat of deflation. The Economist identified 3 areas that are behind the increase.

1. Imported inflation – producer prices in China are increasing as prices at the factory gate rose by 5.5% and the spare capacity in the economy is getting smaller. Furthermore there has been an improvement in demand especially in Asia. Additionally oil prices have increased to over $50 per barrel up from $30. Therefore a lot the above imports have become more expensive which could lead to higher prices. However a lot will depend on the exchange rate – lower value exchange rate means that imports will be more expensive

2. Capacity pressures – with a reduction in spare capacity goods become more scarce so the price of them should increase. The USA economy is close to full capacity with 4.7% unemployment and US Fed chairman Janet Yellen recently indicated that a further increase in interest rates might be necessary to cool increasing pressure on inflation. In the Euro area there is more spare capacity with the unemployment rate of 9.8% – this is especially prevalent in Italy and Spain. Therefore if the inflation rate is to increase in the Euro area it will need countries like Germany, with a 4.1% unemployment rate, to generate it.

3. Inflationary expectations – expectations of further inflation in the future can lead workers to demand higher wages in anticipation of price increases or lead producers to set higher prices in anticipation of increased costs of production. Inflationary expectations have reached their highest level in 12 years according to a survey of fund managers. But it has also raised fears the world is heading for a period of low growth, higher unemployment and accompanied by high inflation leads to stagflation.

Inflation Expectations.png

Sources: The Economist, FT

AS Level – Economic systems: North Korea

February 14, 2017 Leave a comment

Following on the theme of economic systems and North Korea, below is a documentary from the BBC Panorama programme. John Sweeney goes undercover in North Korea and finds out what life is really like. The documentary shows: State ownership, State control, price controls and extreme government failure in poor quality goods and services, massive shortages, and crippling unemployment. He does venture over the border to South Korea  where the experience is in stark contrast. Good video to finish off the market systems topic.

USA and China Trade – will the USA create more jobs?

February 13, 2017 Leave a comment

USA China Trade Deficit.pngDonald Trump appointed Peter Navarro as the head of the newly created National Trade Council – it has been his anti-China stance outlined in his book ‘Death by China’ that has led to his surprise hiring by Trump. The book talks of the economic and military rise of China and the demise of the US manufacturing industry unable to compete with the Chinese sweatshops.

However a lot of the criticisms that Navarro has pointed at China have been quite valid.

1. Currency – the intervention on the foreign exchange market to keep their currency weak so improving the competitiveness of exports.
2. Intellectual property – forcing American firms to hand over intellectual property as a condition of access to the Chinese market.
3. Pollution – Chinese firms pollute the environment and have weak environmental controls on industry.
4. Working conditions – these are far worse than what is the law in most industrialized countries.
5. Export subsidies – government assistance help reduce the cost and ultimately the price of exports from China.

In 2006 he estimated that 41% of China’s competitive advantage over the USA in manufacturing came from unfair practices like those above and when China joined the WTO in 2001 the trade deficit with the USA ballooned at the same time millions of manufacturing jobs disappeared. The deficit though was funded by the Chinese and it was a consequence of the Chinese buying US Treasury bills – to put it simply the Chinese funded US consumers to buy Chinese products. Niall Ferguson refers to the relationship as Chimerica – the two are interdependent in that the USA borrows off the Chinese and then uses that money to buy Chinese products.

Navarro believes that with China adhering to global trade rules the deficit in manufacturing will decrease and manufacturing jobs will return to the US. However when jobs return they are not the same as they were in previous years as it is highly likely that productivity/technology has refined the production process. Research has also suggested that when the trade deficit with China increased (1998-2010) the loss of manufacturing jobs only rose slightly 2.5m to 2.7m. One wonders what Navarro will do in the coming months?

Sources: The Economist, The Ascent of Money by Niall Ferguson.

Categories: Trade Tags: ,

Satellite photo for teaching economic systems

February 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Teaching economic systems with my AS Level class and I use this great satellite photo to introduce the topic. I usually get students to write down what they understand by the photo. You should get a range of answers from – “they have no nightlife in North Korea” to “North Korea has a controlled economic system and it is blacked out from failure of the electrical grid except for Kim Jong Il’s palace”.

I got the image from the book Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea. The book looks at the lives of six defectors from the repressive totalitarian regime of the Republic of North Korea and how it collapsed catastrophically into poverty, darkness, and starvation under the dictator’s son, Kim Jong Il.

The 3 heads of Donald Trump

February 10, 2017 Leave a comment

Below is a great cartoon clip from the FT with Gillian Tett talking about the 3 heads of Donald Trump. With some excellent cartoon graphics she goes through each of the following:

  1. The sensible serious Trump
  2. The love to shock Trump
  3. Sleezy, freewheeling, write my own rules, anti elitist Trump

One wonders which Trump will be more prevalent in his presidency? A lot of references to economics – animal spirits, NAFTA, tax cuts, corporate tax etc. As Gillian Tett points out ‘nobody really knows who he is’

Categories: Politics Tags: ,

Global change in real income – 1988-2008

February 7, 2017 Leave a comment

Below is graphic from ANZ Bank showing the change in real income between 1988 and 2008 at various percentiles of global income distribution (calculated in 2005 international dollars). Global inequality has improved except for the upper middle class.

income-inequality

Some comparisons of income distribution:

  • An American having the average income of the bottom U.S. decile is better-off than 2/3 of world population.
  • The richest 1% of people in the world receive as much as the bottom 57%, or in other words, less than 50 million richest people receive as much as 2.7 billion poor.
  • The three richest people possess more financial assets than the poorest 10% of the world’s population, combined.
  • In 2005, the three richest people in the world have total assets that exceed the annual combined GDP of the 47 countries with the least GDP.
  • In 2005, the 125 richest people in the world have assets that exceed the annual combined GDP of all the least developed countries.
  • In January this year Oxfam calculated that the eight richest men in the world own the same wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of humanity.

The world’s 8 richest people are, in order of net worth:

1. Bill Gates: America founder of Microsoft (net worth $75 billion)
2. Amancio Ortega: Spanish founder of Inditex which owns the Zara fashion chain (net worth $67 billion)
3. Warren Buffett: American CEO and largest shareholder in Berkshire Hathaway (net worth $60.8 billion)
4. Carlos Slim Helu: Mexican owner of Grupo Carso (net worth: $50 billion)
5. Jeff Bezos: American founder, chairman and chief executive of Amazon (net worth: $45.2 billion)
6. Mark Zuckerberg: American chairman, chief executive officer, and co-founder of Facebook (net worth $44.6 billion)
7. Larry Ellison: American co-founder and CEO of Oracle  (net worth $43.6 billion)
8. Michael Bloomberg: American founder, owner and CEO of Bloomberg LP (net worth: $40 billion)

Sources: ANZ Bank, Wikipedia, Oxfam International

Categories: Inequality Tags:

Options for taking on Trump – the Japanese Model.

February 7, 2017 Leave a comment

trump-abeA colleague alerted me to a Terrie Lloyd a New Zealand businessman in Japan who writes a weekly newsletter. With the election of Donald Trump his recent writing looked at bullies and ways in which you deal with them. Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, has been proactive in getting to know Trump and his team and how the two countries can work together.

Research on bullies

Lloyd suggests that there are generally three ways to deal with a bully.

Run – UK seem to be taking this option
Fight – Chinese will do this
Suffer and appease – Japan, having a bullying culture already, will go for appeasement

Abe will be meeting with Trump on 10th February for a second time in as many months and will want to convince him that Japan is one of the good guys and if he has to pick on someone in the area he should pick on China. For this to work Abe also needs to feed Trump’s ego publicly

Lloyd looks at the work of Dacher Keltner who has written about appeasement and related
human emotion and social practice. He looks at two general classes of appeasement.

1) reactive – the person provides appropriate responses after incidents and these responses are usually public displays of embarrassment and shame.
2) anticipatory appeasement where a person is proactive and engages in certain strategies to avoid conflict. Polite modesty and shyness are also considered anticipatory appeasement.

Japanese Model for dealing with bullies

With Japan taking the latter option, Keltner is suggesting that Abe must appease Trump with gifts of value and that they are seen publicly to assist Trumps power and reputation. Last month the Japanese gave access to US car manufacturers but will that be enough to keep Trump happy? At the meeting on 10th February Abe will propose a package that could generate 700,000 U.S. jobs and help create a $450-billion market. It includes the building of infrastructure projects such as high-speed trains in the northeastern United States, and the states of Texas and California, and renovating subway and train cars. It also includes cooperation in global infrastructure investment, joint development of robots and artificial intelligence, and cooperation in cybersecurity and space exploration, among others.

Toyota the car manufacturer has also been taking the appeasement option after the Trump administration criticised their building of a second car assembly plant in Mexico and also threatened to impose a 20% tariff on Japanese automobile and auto parts makers with plants in Mexico. Toyota quickly announced it would invest $10 billion in its U.S. operations over the next five years.

Abe has definitely been massaging the ego of Trump not only being the first international leader to visit Washington after his election but also telling Trump that he “hopes the United States will become a greater country through (your) leadership,” adding Japan wants to “fulfill our role as your ally.” It will be interesting to see what happens after their meeting on Friday 10th February.

Sources: Terrie Lloyd,  The Japan Times

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