Home > Development Economics > International migration – what about developing to developing countries?

International migration – what about developing to developing countries?

When you look at figures regarding international migration, the movement of people from developing to developed countries is most talked about and is the most common of the four types. Figures issued by the McKinsey Global Institute estimate that 120m people have made this move – see graphic below:

Developing Countries Migration.png

The second largest move is from developing to developing countries with just under 80m. This flow has been a popular option as people leave a poor country for a somewhat less poor country in search of higher wages. For instance the World bank estimated that 1.5m migrants from Bukino Faso live in the Ivory Coast which is proportionately larger than Indians in the UK, Turks in Germany and Mexicans in the US. The Ivory Coast is a poor country but not as poor as Burkina Faso and with wages double what they are in Burkina Faso migration is an attractive proposition. The World Bank estimates that $343m in remittances flowed from Ivory Coast to Burkina Faso in 2015 and accounts for 87% of all remittances.

Another example of movement from a developing to developing country is India and Bangladesh with an estimate of 20m Bangladeshis living in India. The World Bank estimates that more money is remitted to Bangladesh from India than from any other country – $4.5bn in 2015.

Why is developing to developing becoming more prominent?

  • Neighbouring countries tend to share currencies meaning money can be moved more easily in ways that officials do not notice.
  • Poorer people cannot afford travel to the West or the Gulf
  • The poorer people are the shorter the distance they can travel so neighboring countries might be attractive
  • Neighboring countries often share a language
  • Tribes often span borders of developing countries
  • In developed countries most jobs require legal documentation and authorisation. In the developing world informal work is seen as the norm.
  • More less-skilled work is available in developing countries.
  • The West does not have enough jobs for those from developing countries – African, Asian countries may offer more opportunity.

Sources: McKinsey Global Institute, The Economist.

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