Home > Inflation, Interest Rates > Does the RBNZ need to cut the OCR?

Does the RBNZ need to cut the OCR?

With the RBNZ to announce the Official Cash Rate next Thursday there is common agreement that there will be a 0.25% cut to leave the OCR at 2.00%. However with 2.8% growth and a favourable PMI do the RBNZ need to cut rates? With inflation at 0.4% it is still not between the 1-3% target range (as outlined by the Policy Target Agreement in the Reserve Bank Act 1989), and there is pressure for the central bank to hit a target of 2% inflation. With the global economy in an era of very low inflation (even a threat of deflation) one wonders the logic of keeping the PTA at 1-3%. In fact it is being reviewed by the RBNZ in the next month. The logic behind the lower OCR will be to stimulate more spending but also trying to make the NZ$ less attractive for foreign investors.

NZ Economy

With NZ rates being significantly higher than other developed countries the NZ$ is seen as a good investment and ultimately attracts a lot of ‘Hot Money’ into the economy. The NZ$ is the 10th most traded currency in the world and this is also due to the stable environment in the NZ economy as well as relatively high interest rates. But have the lower rates had the effect of reducing the value if the NZ$? A lower dollar makes exports prices more competitive and increases the price of imports.

Interest Rates NZ$

If you contrast the OCR with the TWI over the last year you will see that a lower OCR doesn’t necessarily mean a lower NZ$. Furthermore the lower rates do nothing to halt the rise in the property market especially in Auckland.

The RBNZ faces potentially conflicting outcomes as it tries maintain financial stability and price stability. The Policy Targets Agreement demands lower interest rates in a bid to raise CPI inflation while financial stability concerns, especially with the housing market,  probably demands higher rates.

Images from ANZ Bank

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: